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Major British Warship Losses in World War 2
 

DESTROYERS, including Escort Destroyers & ex-US Flushdeckers

 

by Gordon Smith, Naval-History.Net

HMS Matabele, lost 17 January 1942  (Courtesy NavyPhotos)

on to Submarines

 
 

LOSSES BY YEAR and AREA

(in date order within each year  ctl - constructive total loss)

 

 

Year

Atlantic

Europe

Mediterranean

Far East

 

1939

 

 

-

 

Blanche, Gipsy, Duchess

 

 

-

 

-

1940

Whirlwind, Margaree (RCN)

Grenville, Exmouth, Daring, Glowworm, Gurkha, Hardy, Hunter, Afridi, Valentine, Whitley, Wessex, Grafton, Grenade, Wakeful, Keith, Basilisk, Havant, Acasta, Ardent, Fraser (RCN), Imogen, Brazen, Codrington, Wren, Delight, Esk, Ivanhoe, Venetia, Sturdy, Cameron (ctl), Acheron (total 31)

 

Khartoum, Escort, Hostile, Hyperion

 

-

1941

Mashona, Broadwater, Cossack, Stanley

Exmoor

Gallant (ctl), Dainty, Mohawk, Diamond, Wryneck, Jersey, Juno, Greyhound, Kashmir, Kelly, Hereward, Imperial, Waterhen (RAN), Defender, Fearless, Kandahar (16)

 

Thracian

1942

Matabele, Belmont, Punjabi, Wild Swan, Ottawa (RCN), Somali, Veteran, Saguenay (RCN), Firedrake, Achates (10)

Vimiera, Vortigern, Campbeltown, Berkeley, Penylan (5)

Gurkha (2), Maori, Southwold, Legion, Jaguar, Havock, Lance (ctl), Kingston, Heythrop, Lively, Kipling, Jackal, Grove, Bedouin, Airedale, Hasty, Nestor (RAN), Foresight, Eridge (ctl), Sikh, Zulu, Broke, Martin, Ithuriel (ctl), Quentin, Porcupine (ctl), Blean, Partridge (28)

 

Thanet, Jupiter, Electra, Encounter, Stronghold, Tenedos,

Vampire (RAN), Yoyager (RAN) (8)

1943

Harvester, Beverley, St Croix (RCN), Hurricane

Limbourne

Lightning, Derwent (ctl), Pakenham, Arrow (ctl), Intrepid, Panther, Hurworth, Eclipse, Rockwood (ctl), Dulverton, Holcombe, Tynedale (12)

 

-

1944

Hardy (2), Mahratta, Skeena (RCN)

Warwick, Athabaskan (RCN), Wrestler (ctl), Boadicea, Fury (ctl), Swift, Isis, Goathland (ctl), Quorn, Rockingham, Wensleydale (ctl) (12)

 

Janus, Inglefield, Laforey, Quail, Loyal (ctl), Aldenham 

 

-

1945

 

-

Walpole (ctl) 

-

Pathfinder (ctl)

 

 

 


 

 

 

WORLD WAR 1 CLASSES

 

 

46. 'R' and 'S' classes, 12 ships - 900 tons, 36 knots, 1-4in, 90 crew, 1918-24, 5 lost:  

STRONGHOLD (Lt Cdr G R Pretor-Pinney+), 2nd March 1942, Indian Ocean, south of Java - by gunfire of Japanese 8in cruiser 'Maya' and destroyers. Sailing from Java to Australia; 70 crew lost, 51 taken prisoner, 5 died in captivity (Japanese Invasion of Java)

 

STURDY (Lt Cdr G T Cooper), 30th October 1940, Western Europe, west coast of Scotland, on Tiree Island (c56.30N, 07.00W) - ran aground in fog and wrecked. Local Western Approaches with Halifax/UK convoy SC.8; five crew lost (Battle of the Atlantic)

 

TENEDOS (Lt Cdr R Dyer), 5th April 1942, Indian Ocean, Colombo harbour, Ceylon - by Japanese carrier bombers. ‘Tenedos’ was in harbour; 17 crew lost including two Chinese stewards (Japanese Carrier Attacks on Ceylon)

 

THANET (Lt Cdr B S Davies), 27th January 1942, South East Asia off Endau, south east Malaya in South China Sea - by gunfire of Japanese 5.5in cruiser 'Sendai' and destroyers. ‘Thanet’ and Australian destroyer 'Vampire' were attacking Japanese troop transports; 37 of ‘Thanet’s’ crew were lost in the sinking, some survivors escaped, others became POWs (Japanese Invasion of Malaya)

 

THRACIAN (Cdr A L Pears), 17th December 1941, Far East at Hong Kong - ran aground, dry-docked but damaged by Japanese bombing, later beached. ‘Thracian’ was in action during the Japanese invasion of Hong Kong. She was alvaged and served in Japanese Navy (Japanese Invasion of Hong Kong)

 

Surviving ships - SABRE, SALADIN, SARDONYX, SCIMITAR, SCOUT, SHIKARI, SKATE

 

HMS Shikari pre-war

 

 

47. 'V' and 'W' classes, 58 ships - 1,100 tons, 34 knots, 2 to 4-4in, 125 crew, 1917-24. Many converted to escorts, 16 lost, 2 not repaired: 

VALENTINE (Cdr H J Buchanan RAN), 15th May 1940, Western Europe off Terneuzen, Holland in the Scheldt Estuary - damaged by German Ju.88 bombers and beached. Protecting Scheldt ferry; 31 crew lost (German invasion of Holland and Belgium)

 

VAMPIRE (RAN) (Cdr W T Moran RAN), 9th April 1942, Indian Ocean off south east coast of Ceylon (07.35N, 82.05E) - by Japanese carrier divebombers. Returning to Trincomalee with carrier 'Hermes', also sunk; eight crew lost (Japanese Carrier Attacks on Ceylon)

 

VENETIA (Lt Cdr D L C Craig+), 19th October 1940, Western Europe 15 miles off North Foreland in Thames Estuary, south east England (51.33N, 01.10E) - by German mine. On patrol with destroyers 'Garth' and 'Walpole'; 35 crew lost  (Defence of British Waters)

 

VETERAN, 26th September 1942, Mid Atlantic, far west of Ireland (54.34N, 25.44W) – torpedoed by German ‘U.404’ (Bülow). Escorting convoy RB.1 of Great Lakes steamers from Newfoundland to UK; all 160 crew lost (Battle of the Atlantic)

 

VIMIERA (Lt Cdr A A Mackenzie RNR), 9th January 1942, Western Europe in Thames Estuary, SE England (c51.30N, 01.00E) - by German mine. Escorting southbound East Coast convoy; 92 crew lost (British Coastal Convoys)

 

VORTIGERN (Lt Cdr R S Howlett+), 15th March 1942, Western Europe, off Cromer, East Coast of England in North Sea (c53.00N, 01.15E) – torpedoed by German E-boat ‘S.104’. Escorting Firth of Forth/Thames coastal convoy FS.749; 146 crew lost (British Coastal Convoys)

 

VOYAGER (RAN), 23rd September 1942, East Indies, south coast of Timor (09.11S, 125.43E) - ran aground, attacked by Japanese aircraft and destroyed by own forces. Landing reinforcements for Dutch and Australian 'Sparrow' guerrilla force on Timor; no crew lost, all rescued by minesweepers ‘Warrnambool’ and ‘Kalgoorlie’ (In Support of Land Forces)

 

WAKEFUL (Cdr R L Fisher), 29th May 1940, Western Europe off Nieuport, Belgium (51.20N, 02.45E) – torpedoed by German E-boat ‘S.30’. Evacuating approximately 650 troops from Dunkirk to Dover during Operation 'Dynamo'; 98 crew and all but one of the soldiers lost, 25 crew and the one soldier rescued (Dunkirk Evacuation)

 

WALPOLE (Lt Cdr G C Crawley), damaged 6th January 1945, Western Europe off the Scheldt Estuary, Holland (51.33N, 03.06E) - by German mine. Escorting cross-Channel convoy; two crew lost. Not repaired (Defence of British Waters)

 

WARWICK (Cdr D A Rayner), 20th February 1944, Western Europe off Trevose Head, north Cornwall, south west England (50.27N, 05.23W) – torpedoed by German ‘U.413’ (Poel). On patrol in support of coastal convoys; 66 crew lost, 93 saved (British Coastal Convoys)

 

WATERHEN (RAN), 30th June 1941, Eastern Mediterranean off Bardia, east Libya (32.15N, 25.20E) - by German divebombers on the 29th June. With Inshore Squadron carrying supplies on the 'Tobruk Run' to the besieged town. Damaged evening of the 29th, capsized early on the 30th; there were no casualties (North African Campaign).

 

WESSEX (Lt Cdr W A R Cartwright), 24th May 1940, Western Europe off Calais, northern France in English Channel - by German bombers. Supporting British land forces in the defence of Calais; 6 crew lost (German invasion of France).

 

WHIRLWIND (Lt Cdr J M Rodgers), 5th July 1940, North Atlantic 120 miles west of Lands End, south west England (50.17N, 08.48W) – torpedoed by German ‘U.34’ (Rollmann). Detached from UK outward OB convoy to search for reported U-boat with destroyer 'Westcott'; 57 crew lost (Battle of the Atlantic)

 

WHITLEY (Lt Cdr G N Rolfe), 19th May 1940, Western Europe, between Nieuport and Ostend, Belgium - damaged by German bombers and beached. Supporting Allied land forces including blocking ports and lifting off refugees; 4 crew lost (German invasion of Holland and Belgium).

 

WILD SWAN (Lt Cdr C E L Sclater), 17th June 1942, North Atlantic off south west Ireland (49.52N, 10.44W) - by German Ju.88 bombers. With support group for Gibraltar/UK convoy HG.84; 31 crew lost (Battle of the Atlantic)

 

WREN (Cdr F W G Harker+), 27th July 1940, Western Europe, 10 miles of Aldeburgh, eastern England in North Sea (52.10N, 02.06E) - by German bombers. With destroyer 'Montrose' providing AA defence for minesweeping trawlers; 35 crew lost (Defence of British Waters)

 

WRESTLER (Lt Cdr R W Lacon), damaged 6th June 1944, Western Europe off Normandy beaches, northern France in English Channel (49.36N, 00.27W) - by German mine. Escorting convoy to British sector as part of operation Neptune; 2 crew lost. Not repaired (Normandy Invasion)

 

WRYNECK (Lt Cdr R H D Lane+), 27th April 1941, Eastern Mediterranean, east of Cape Malea, south east Greece (c36.30N, 23.30E) - by German bombers. Evacuating British & Dominion troops from Greece with destroyer 'Diamond', also sunk; 114 of ‘Wryneck’s’ crew were lost, 42 saved (Evacuation of Greece)

 

Surviving ships - VALOROUS, VANESSA, VANITY, VANOC, VANQUISHER, VANSITTART, VEGA, VELOX, VENDETTA (RAN), VENOMOUS, VERDUN, VERITY, VERSATILE, VESPER, VICEROY, VIDETTE, VIMY, VVISCOUNT, VIVACIOUS, VIVIEN, VOLUNTEER, WALKER, WANDERER, WATCHMAN, WESTCOTT, WESTMINSTER, WHITEHALL, WHITSHED, WINCHELSEA, WINCHESTER, WINDSOR, WISHART, WITCH, WITHERINGTON, WIVERN, WOLFHOUND, WOLSEY, WOLVERINE, WOOLSTON, WORCESTER

 

HMS Westcott

 

 

48. Shakespeare class, 3 ships - 1,480 tons, 36 knots, 2-4.7in, 160 crew, 1919-22, 1 lost: 

BROKE (Lt Cdr A F C Layard), foundered 9th November 1942, Western Mediterranean off Algiers, Algeria - hit by French shore batteries on the 8th November in 36.50N, 03.00E. With destroyer 'Malcolm', under command of Capt H St J Fancourt in ‘Broke’, landing troops at Algiers during Operation 'Torch', the Allied invasion of French North Africa. Sank in tow of escort destroyer ‘Zetland’; 9 crew lost (French North African Campaign)

 

Surviving ships - KEPPEL, WALLACE

 

HMS Shakespeare - broken up 1936

 

 

49. Scott class, 7 ships - 1,530 tons, 36 knots, 2 to 5 -4.7in, 160 crew, 1918-19 

Surviving ships - CAMPBELL, DOUGLAS, MACKAY, MALCOLM, MONTROSE, STUART (RAN). Also BRUCE, disarmed and expended in 1939

 

HMS Douglas

 

 

FLEET DESTROYERS AFTER 1918

 

 

 

50. Amazon & Ambuscade, 2 prototypes, both survived - 1,350 and 1,170 tons, 37 knots, 4-4.7in/6tt, 140 crew, 1926

 

 

 

51. 'A' and 'B' classes, 20 ships including leaders - 1,350 tons, 35 knots, 4-4.7in/8tt, 140 crew, 1930-31, 11 lost and 2 not repaired: 

CODRINGTON ('A' leader) (Capt G F Stevens-Guille), 27th July 1940, Western Europe at Dover, SE England - by German bombers. In harbour refitting and boiler cleaning after evacuating Allied forces from Dunkirk and Le Havre, run aground with broken back but beyond salvage. No lives lost (Dunkirk Evacuation)

 

ACASTA (Cdr C E Glasfurd+) and ARDENT (Lt Cdr J E Barker+), both 8th June 1940, Western Europe, west of Lofoten Islands in Norwegian Sea (68.45N, 04.30E) - by gunfire of 11in German battlecruisers 'Scharnhorst' and 'Gneisenau'. Escorting carrier 'Glorious' from northern Norway at end of Allied evacuation. 'Glorious' also sunk and 'Scharnhorst' damaged by torpedo from 'Acasta', which lost 161 crew with one survivor. ‘Ardent’ lost 151 with two survivors, one of whom died in captivity (Norwegian Campaign)

 

ACHATES (Lt Cdr A H T Johns+), 31st December 1942, Arctic Ocean, north east of North Cape in Barents Sea (73.18N, 30.06E) - by 8in gunfire of German cruiser 'Admiral Hipper'. Escorting UK/Russian convoy JW.51B; 113 crew lost, 81 saved (Battle of the Barents Sea - Russian Convoys)

 

ACHERON (Lt J R Wilson+), 17th December 1940, Western Europe, off Isle of Wight, southern England in English Channel (50.31N, 01.31W) - by German mine. Running trials after refit and repairs to bomb damage; 153 crew and 22 dockyard workers lost. Just 13 crew and 3 dockyard workers were saved

 

ARROW (Lt Cdr W W Fitzroy), damaged 4th August 1943, Western Mediterranean, off Algiers Harbour, Algeria - by explosion of SS 'Fort Le Montée' and resulting fire. 'Arrow' alongside at time to assist with firefighting; 36 crew lost. Partially repaired for limited duties (French North African Campaign)

 

SAGUENAY (RCN) (Lt Cdr D C Wallace RCNR), damaged 15th November 1942, North Atlantic, 12 miles off Cape Race, SE Newfoundland - collision with SS 'Azara'. Escorting iron ore convoy WB.13, Wabans to Sydney, Cape Breton Island, lost her stern when depth charges exploded; one crew lost. Not repaired (Battle of the Atlantic)

 

SKEENA (RCN) (Lt Cdr P F X Russell RCN), 25th October 1944, North Atlantic at Reykjavik, Iceland - driven ashore in heavy gale and wrecked. With Canadian 11th Escort Group operating in the Iceland/Shetland passage against U-boats; 15 crew lost, 123 saved (Battle of the Atlantic)

 

KEITH ('B' leader) (Capt E L Berthon) and BASILISK (Cdr M Richardson), both 1st June 1940, Western Europe off Dunkirk, northern France in English Channel - by German Ju.87 divebombers. Evacuating Allied forces from Dunkirk during Operation 'Dynamo'. ‘Keith’ lost 36 crew in the sinking with 130 saved, ‘Basilisk’ lost nine (Dunkirk Evacuation)

 

BLANCHE (Lt Cdr R M Aubrey), 13th November 1939, Western Europe in Thames Estuary, SE England - by German destroyer-laid mines. Escorting minelayer 'Adventure' (also mined) from Grimsby to Portsmouth. Mined one mile 80° from NE Spit Buoy, sank two hours later; two crew lost.

 

BOADICEA (Lt Cdr F W Hawkins), 13th June 1944, Western Europe off Portland Bill, southern England in English Channel (50.26N, 02.34W) – torpedoed by German Ju.88 torpedo bombers. Escorting follow-up convoy to Normandy beachhead; 175 crew lost, 12 saved (Normandy Invasion)

 

BRAZEN (Lt Cdr Sir Michael Culme-Seymour), 20th July 1940, Western Europe off Dover, SE England in English Channel - by German bombers. Escorting English Channel convoy CW.7, Thames to Isle of Wight, sank in tow next day; one rating lost (British Coastal Convoys)

 

Surviving ships - ACTIVE, ANTELOPE, ANTHONY, BEAGLE, BOREAS (Greek 'Salamis' from 1944) BRILLIANT, BULLDOG

 


HMS Beagle

 

 

52. 'C' and 'D' classes, 14 ships including leaders - 1,370 tons, 36 knots, 4-4.7in/8tt, 145 crew, 1932-33, 9 lost: 

FRASER (RCN, ex-'Crescent) (Cdr W B Creery RCN), 25th June 1940, Western Europe, off Gironde Estuary, western France (45.44N, 01.31W) - by collision with British cruiser 'Calcutta'. Returning with 'Calcutta' from supporting Allied evacuation of south west France, operation 'Aerial'; 59 crew lost (German Invasion of France)

 

OTTAWA (RCN, ex-'Crusader') (Lt Cdr C A Rutherford RCN), 14th September 1942, North Atlantic, east of Newfoundland (47.55N, 43.27W) – torpedoed by German ‘U.91’ (Walkerling). With Canadian C4 Group supporting UK/North American convoy ON.127; 116 crew lost, 76 saved (Battle of the Atlantic)

 

DAINTY (Cdr M S Thomas), 24th February 1941, Eastern Mediterranean, off Tobruk, eastern Libya - by German Ju.87 divebombers. With 'Inshore Squadron' escorting supplies on 'Tobruk Run', leaving Tobruk with destroyer ‘Hasty’; 15 crew lost, 140 survivors but one died of wounds (North African Campaign)

 

DARING (Cdr S A Cooper+), 18th February 1940, Western Europe, off Pentland Firth, northern Scotland (58.40N, 01.35W) – torpedoed by German ‘U.23’ (Kretschmer). Escorting Norway/UK convoy HN.12; 154 crew lost, 5 survivors (Defence of Trade)

 

DEFENDER, 11th July 1941, Eastern Mediterranean, off Sidi Barrani, Egypt (c31.45N, 25.30E) - by German or Italian bombers. With 'Inshore Squadron' carrying supplies on 'Tobruk Run', bombed at 31.45N, 25.51E, sank in tow seven miles N of Sidi Barrani; there was no loss of life (North African Campaign)

 

DELIGHT (Cdr M Fogg-Elliot), 29th July 1940, Western Europe, 20 miles south of Portland Bill, southern England in English Channel - by German bombers. Escorting English Channel convoy; 18 crew lost (British Coastal Convoys)

 

DIAMOND (Lt Cdr P A Cartwright+), 27th April 1941, Eastern Mediterranean, east of Cape Malea, SE Greece (c36.30N, 23.30E) - by German bombers. Evacuating British and Dominion troops from Greece with destroyer 'Wryneck', also sunk. ‘Diamond’s’ entire crew was lost – 149 men (Evacuation of Greece)

 

DUCHESS (Lt Cdr R C M White+), 12th December 1939, Western Europe, 9 miles W of Mull of Kintyre in North Channel between Scotland and Northern Ireland - in collision with British battleship 'Barham'. Escorting 'Barham' from Gibraltar to join Home Fleet in the Clyde; 130 crew lost, 23 survivors (Home Fleet Operations)

 

MARGAREE (RCN, ex-'Diana') (Cdr J W R Roy RCN+), 22nd October 1940, North Atlantic, west of Ireland (53.24N, 22.50W) - by collision with SS 'Port Fairy' (8,337grt). Escorting Liverpool-out convoy OL.8; 144 crew lost, 32 were saved (Battle of the Atlantic)

 

Surviving ships - ASSINIBOINE (RCN leader, ex-'Kempenfelt'), RESTIGOUCHE (RCN, ex-'Comet'), ST LAURENT (RCN, ex-'Cygnet'), DUNCAN (leader), DECOY (RCN KOOTENAY from 1943)

 


HMS
Daring

 

53. 'E' and 'F' classes, 18 ships including leaders - 1,370 tons, 36 knots, 4-4.7in/8tt, 145 crew, 1934-35, 9 lost and 1 not repaired: 

EXMOUTH (leader) (Capt R S Benson+), 21st January 1940, Western Europe, SE of Wick, NE Scotland in North Sea (c58.15N, 02.30W) - torpedoed by German ‘U.22’ (Jenisch). Hunting for reported U-boat in the Moray Firth; lost with all hands – 189 men (Defence of British Waters)

 

ECLIPSE (Cdr E Mack), 24th October 1943, Eastern Mediterranean, north of Kos Island in the Dodecanese (37.01N, 27.11E) - by mines laid by German minelayer 'Drache' (ex-Yugoslavian). Carrying troops to Leros; 118 crew including Cdre Todd, Levant Destroyer Flotilla and 142 troops lost (British Aegean Campaign)

 

ELECTRA (Cdr C W May+), 27th February 1942, East Indies, NW of Surabaya, Java in the Java Sea (c06.30S, 112.00E) - by gunfire of Japanese cruiser force and destroyers. With Allied cruiser force in action; 108 crew lost, five taken prisoner, 45 rescued by US submarine ‘S.38’ (Battles of the Java Sea - Japanese Invasion of Java)

 

ENCOUNTER (Lt Cdr E V St J Morgan), 1st March 1942, East Indies, NW of Surabaya in Java Sea (c04.30S, 111.00E) - by Japanese 8in cruisers ‘Myoko’, ‘Ashigara’ and destroyers. Sailing from Surabaya with British cruiser 'Exeter' for the Sunda Strait after the main Java Sea action; seven crew lost, 151 captured, of whom 38 died as POWs (Battles of the Java Sea - Japanese Invasion of Java)

 

ESCORT (Lt Cdr J Bostock), 11th July 1940, Western Mediterranean, east of Gibraltar (36.11N, 03.37W) – torpedoed by Italian submarine 'Marconi' (Chialamberto). Returning to Gibraltar with Force H at the time of the 'Action off Calabria', torpedoed in 36.20N, 03.46W, foundered in tow later that day; two ratings lost (Mediterranean Operations)

 

ESK (Lt Cdr R J H Couch+), 1st September 1940, Western Europe, off Frisian Islands, Holland in North Sea (c53.30N, 03.45E) - German mines late on the 31st/early on the 1st. Minelaying mission off Dutch coast during threat of German invasion of Britain. Destroyers 'Express' damaged and 'Ivanhoe' sunk. ‘Esk’ lost 135 crew; there were only two survivors (Battle of Britain)

 

FEARLESS (Cdr A F Pugsley), 23rd July 1941, Western Mediterranean, 50 miles NNE of Bone, Algeria (37.40N, 08.20E) – torpedoed by Italian torpedo aircraft. With Gibraltar-based Force H covering Gibraltar/Malta convoy 'Substance'; 27 crew lost (Malta Convoys)

 

FIREDRAKE (Cdr E H Tilden+), night of 16th/17th December 1942, Mid North Atlantic (50.50N, 25.15W) – torpedoed by German ‘U.211’ (Hause). Escorting UK/North America convoy ON.153; 170 crew lost, 26 saved by corvette ‘Sunflower’ (Battle of the Atlantic)

 

FORESIGHT (Lt Cdr R A Fell), scuttled 13th August 1942, Western Mediterranean, NE of Bone, Algeria off Galita Island (37.40N, 10.00E) - torpedoed on 12th by Italian torpedo aircraft. Close escort Gibraltar/Malta convoy 'Pedestal'; five crew lost, 140 saved (Malta Convoys)

 

FURY (Cdr C H Campbell), damaged 21st June 1944, Western Europe, Sword Beach area, Normandy beaches, northern France - by German mine and driven ashore in gale. Convoy escort to Normandy beachhead during Allied invasion; no loss of life. Not repaired (Normandy Invasion)

 

Surviving ships - ECHO (Greek ‘Navarinon' from 1944), ESCAPADE, EXPRESS (RCN GATINEAU from 1943), FAME, FAULKNOR (leader), FORESTER, FORTUNE (RCN SASKATCHEWAN from 1943), FOXHOUND (RCN QU’APPELLE from 1944)

 

 

54. 'G' and 'H' classes, 18 ships including leaders - 1,330 tons, 36 knots, 4-4.7in/8tt, 145 crew, 1936-37, 14 lost:  

GRENVILLE (leader) (Capt G E Creasy), 19th January 1940, Western Europe, off Kentish Knock, Thames Estuary, SE England (51.39N, 02.17E) - by German destroyer-laid mines. Returning to Harwich from contraband control operations off Dutch coast; 76 crew lost (Contraband Control)

 

GALLANT (Lt Cdr C P F Brown), damaged 10th January 1941, Central Mediterranean, 25 miles SE of Pantelleria island (36.27N, 12.11E) - by Italian mines laid by cruiser force in August 1940. With Mediterranean Fleet covering Gibraltar/Malta convoy 'Excess'. Towed to Malta and finally wrecked by bombing on 5th April 1942. The mining killed 58 crew (Malta Convoys)

 

GIPSY (Cdr N J Crossley+), 21st November 1939, Western Europe off Harwich, east coast of England in North Sea - by German destroyer-laid mines. Leaving Harwich with a destroyer force. She was beached in shallow water with only her hull submerged, and according to one source salvaged, but not re-commissioned; 31 crew lost. Some sources record her loss as due to mines laid by ‘U.19’ (Defence of British Waters)

 

GLOWWORM (Lt Cdr G B Roope+, awarded VC), 8th April 1940, Western Europe, NW of Trondheim in Norwegian Sea (64.13N, 06.28E) - by German 8in-gunned heavy cruiser 'Admiral Hipper'. Detached from screen for British minelaying operations to search for man overboard at time of German invasion of Norway. 'Hipper' damaged when rammed by 'Glowworm'; 118 crew lost, 38 taken prisoner of whom six died in captivity (Norwegian Campaign)

 

GRAFTON (Cdr G E C Robinson+), 29th May 1940, Western Europe, off Nieuport, Belgium in southern North Sea (51.22N, 02.45E) – torpedoed by German ‘U.62’ (Michalowski). Rescuing survivors from destroyer 'Wakeful', scuttled by ‘Intrepid’s’ gunfire; 16 crew lost (Dunkirk Evacuation)

 

GRENADE (Cdr R C Boyle), 29th May 1940, Western Europe in Dunkirk Harbour, northern France - by German bombers. Evacuating Allied forces from Dunkirk, alongside the Mole; 18 crew lost (Dunkirk Evacuation)

 

GREYHOUND (Cdr W R Marshall A’Deane, lost after rescue), 22nd May 1941, Eastern Mediterranean, NW of Crete (c36.00N, 23.15E) - by German Ju.87 divebombers. In action with Mediterranean Fleet against German sea-borne invasion of Crete; 76 crew lost in sinking, at least three killed in the water before rescue (Battle for Crete)

 

HARDY (leader) (Capt B A W Warburton-Lee+, awarded posthumous VC) and HUNTER (Lt Cdr L de Villers+), both 10th April 1940, Western Europe, off Narvik, northern Norway in Ofotfiord - by German destroyer gunfire and torpedoes. Attacking troop transports and destroyers during the German invasion of Norway. ‘Hardy’ lost 19 crew killed in action including the CO and ‘Hunter’ lost 103 (First Battle of Narvik - Norwegian Campaign).

 

HASTY (Lt Cdr N H Austen), 15th June 1942, Eastern Mediterranean, SW of Crete (34.10N, 22.00E) – torpedoed by German E-boat S.55. Cover force for Alexandria/Malta convoy 'Vigorous' (Malta Convoys)

 

HAVOCK (Lt Cdr R Watkins), 6th April 1942, Central Mediterranean, near Cape Bon, Tunisia, off Kelibia in Strait of Sicily (36.48N, 11.08E) - ran aground, finished off by torpedo from Italian submarine 'Aradam' (Gran). On passage from Malta to Gibraltar after being damaged in the Second Battle of Sirte; one crew lost, crew and passengers interned by Vichy French (Malta Convoys)

 

HEREWARD (Lt Cdr W J Munn), 29th May 1941, Eastern Mediterranean, off eastern Crete in Kaso Strait - by German divebombers. With Mediterranean Fleet evacuating British and Dominion from Crete; 75 crew lost, 91 taken prisoner, of whom two died in captivity  (Battle for Crete)

 

HOSTILE (Lt Cdr A F Burnell-Nugent), 23rd August 1940, Central Mediterranean, 18 miles SE of Cape Bon, Tunisia in Strait of Sicily (36.53N, 11.19E) - by Italian destroyer-laid mines. On passage from Malta to Gibraltar, damaged and scuttle by ‘Hero’; four crew and Cdr A P Gibson on passage lost (Mediterranean Operations)

 

HYPERION (Cdr H St L Nicolson), 22nd December 1940, Central Mediterranean, 24 miles east of Cape Bon in Strait of Sicily (c37.00N, 11.30E) - by Italian destroyer-laid mine. Escorting battleship 'Malaya' on passage through from Alexandria to Gibraltar. Damaged by mine, taken in tow, scuttled by ‘Jason’; two rating lost (Mediterranean Operations)

 

Surviving ships - GARLAND (Polish from 1940), GRIFFIN (RCN OTTAWA (2) from 1943), HERO (RCN CHAUDIERE from 1943), HOTSPUR

 

HMCS Chaudiere

 

 

55. 'I' class, 9 ships including leader - 1,370 tons, 36 knots, 4-4.7in/10tt, 145 crew, 1937-38, 6 lost: 

INGLEFIELD (leader) (Cdr C F H Churchill), 25th February 1944, Central Mediterranean, off Anzio beachhead, western Italy (41.26N, 12.36E) - by German aircraft-launched, Hs.293 glider bomb. With cover force; 35 crew lost, 157 saved (Battle for Anzio - Italian Campaign).

 

IMOGEN (Cdr C L Firth), 16th July 1940, Western Europe, off Pentland Firth, north Scotland (58.34N, 02.54W) - in collision with British light cruiser 'Glasgow'. On passage to Scapa Flow, Orkney Islands with 'Glasgow' in heavy fog; 18 crew lost, 132 saved (Home Fleet Operations)

 

IMPERIAL (Lt Cdr C A De W Kitcat), scuttled 29th May 1941, Eastern Mediterranean, off north coast of Crete (35.23N, 25.38E) – damaged by German bombers on 28th. With Mediterranean fleet evacuating British forces from Crete, lifted off troops, steering gear failed and scuttled by ‘Hotspur’; no crew lost. (Battle for Crete)

 

INTREPID (Cdr C A de W Kitcat), capsized 27th September 1943, Eastern Mediterranean, Leros Island in the Aegean Sea - by German Ju.88 bombers on 26th. In harbour after anti-shipping sweep; 15 crew lost, CO wounded (British Aegean campaign)

 

ISIS (Lt H D Durrell), 20th July 1944, Western Europe, off Normandy beaches, northern France - by German mine or possibly 'Neger' human torpedo. On anti-submarine patrol off the Western Sector; 154 crew lost, 20 saved (Normandy Invasion)

 

IVANHOE (Cdr P H Hadow), 1st September 1940, Western Europe, off Frisian Islands, Holland in North Sea (c53.30N, 03.30E) - by German mines on 31st August. Minelaying mission off Dutch coast during the threatened German invasion of Britain. Damaged and finished off by torpedo from ‘Kelvin’; eight crew lost. 'Express' also damaged and 'Esk' sunk (Battle of Britain)

 

Surviving ships - ICARUS, ILEX, IMPULSIVE

 

 

56. Brazilian and Turkish ships building in Britain, 8 ships - 1,370 tons, 35 knots, 3/4-4.7in/8tt, 145 crew, 1940-41, 3 lost and 1 not repaired: 

HARVESTER (Cdr A A Tait+), 11th March 1943, mid-North Atlantic (51.23N, 28.40W) – torpedoed by German U.432 (Eckhardt). With British B3 Group escorting Halifax/UK convoy HX.228; 145 crew lost, the few survivors rescued by French corvette ‘Aconit’ (Battle of the Atlantic)

 

HAVANT (Lt Cdr A F Burnell-Nugent), 1st June 1940, Western Europe, off Dunkirk, northern France in English Channel - by German bombers. Evacuating Allied forces. Badly damaged, taken in tow, sank 5 miles from West Buoy; eight crew lost (Dunkirk Evacuation)

 

HURRICANE (Cdr C E E Paterson), scuttled 25th December 1943, North Atlantic, NE of Azores (45.10N, 22.05W) - by Gnat torpedo from German ‘U.415’ (Neide). With 1st Escort Group supporting UK/African convoys OS.62 and KMS.36, and also US escort carrier 'Card' task force; five crew lost (Battle of the Atlantic)

 

ITHURIEL (Lt Cdr D H Maitland-Makgill-Crichton), damaged 28th November 1942, Western Mediterranean, at Bone, Algeria – near-missed by German bombers. In harbour as part of Force H cover force for Allied invasion of French North Africa; no crew killed. Not repaired (French North African Campaign)

 

Surviving ships - HAVELOCK, HESPERUS, HIGHLANDER, INCONSTANT

 

 

57. Tribal classes, 16 ships - 1,870 tons, 36 knots, 8-4.7in/4tt, 190 crew, 1938/39, 12 lost: 

AFRIDI (Capt P L Vian), 3rd May 1940, Western Europe, NW of Namsos, Norway in Norwegian Sea (66.14N, 05.45E) - by German Ju.87 divebombers. Withdrawing after Allied evacuation of Namsos; 52 crew and around 50 rescued troops and survivors from French destroyer 'Bison' were lost (Norwegian Campaign)

 

BEDOUIN (Cdr B G Scurfield), 15th June 1942, Central Mediterranean, off Pantelleria island in Strait of Sicily (36.12N, 11.38E) - by 6in-gunfire of Italian cruiser 'di Savoia' and torpedo aircraft. Close escort, Gibraltar/Malta convoy 'Harpoon'; 28 crew lost, 213 taken prisoner (Malta Convoys)

 

COSSACK (Capt E L Berthon+), foundered 27th October 1941, North Atlantic, west of Strait of Gibraltar (c35.15N, 08.15W) – torpedoed by German U.563 (Bargsten) in 35.56N, 10.04W late on 23rd. Escorting Gibraltar/UK convoy HG.75, taken in tow but sank; 159 crew lost (Battle of the Atlantic)

 

GURKHA (Cdr A W Buzzard), 9th April 1940, Western Europe, 100 miles SW of Bergen, Norway in North Sea - by German Ju.88 and He.111 bombers. Withdrawing with cruiser force from planned attack on Bergen during German invasion of Norway; 15 crew lost (Norwegian Campaign)

 

MAORI (Cdr R E Courage), 12th February 1942, Central Mediterranean, Malta Grand Harbour - by one bomb from German bombers. In harbour as part of Malta-based destroyer strike force. Many of the crew ashore in shelters, sank at moorings with 2 man killed (North African Campaign)

 

MASHONA (Cdr W H Selby), 28th May 1941, North Atlantic, off Galway, western Ireland (c53.00N, 12.00W) - by German Ju.88 bombers. Returning from successful hunt for German battleship 'Bismarck'; 36 crew lost in the attack (Battle of the Atlantic)

 

MATABELE (Cdr A C Stanford+), 17th January 1942, Arctic Ocean, off Murmansk, Russia in Barents Sea (69.21N, 35.34E) – torpedoed by German ‘U.454’ (Hackländer). Escort, Iceland/Russian convoy PQ.8; 233 crew lost in the sinking, three survivors picked up but all died (Russian Convoys)

 

MOHAWK (Cdr John Eaton), 16th April 1941, Central Mediterranean, off Kerkennah Island, eastern Tunisia – torpedoed by Italian destroyer 'Tarigo'. With three other destroyers in attack on five ship Italian convoy. All five ships and three escorts, including 'Tarigo' sunk. Finally scuttled by gunfire from ‘Janus’; 41 crew lost, 161 survivors (Action off Sfax - North African Campaign).

 

PUNJABI (Cdr J M G Waldegrave), 1st May 1942, North Atlantic, east of Iceland (66N, 8W) - in collision with battleship 'King George V'. Escort to 'King George V' as cover force for Iceland/Russian convoy PQ.15; 50 crew lost, 206 saved (Russian Convoys)

 

SIKH (Capt St J A Micklethwaite), 14th September 1942, Eastern Mediterranean, off Tobruk, eastern Libya (32.65N, 24.00E) - by German shore batteries. Landing Royal Marines for British combined operations raid on Tobruk; 21 crew lost, 5 died as POW’s (North African Campaign)

 

SOMALI (Lt Cdr C D Maud), foundered 24th September 1942, North Atlantic, north of Iceland (69.11N, 15.32W) – torpedoed by German ‘U.703’ (Bielfeld) in the Greenland Sea in 75.40N, 02.00W on the 20th. Close escort, Russia/UK convoy QP.14. Being towed by 'Ashanti', went down in bad weather; 82 crew lost (Russian Convoys)

 

ZULU (Cdr R T White), 14th September 1942, Eastern Mediterranean, NW of Alexandria, Egypt (32.00N, 28.56E) - by Italian/German force of Ju.87 and Ju.88 bombers. Returning to Alexandria after combined operations raid on Tobruk (see 'Sikh' above); 39 crew lost, survivors rescued by escort destroyers ‘Croome’ and ‘Hursley’. Cruiser 'Coventry' also lost (North African Campaign)

 

Surviving ships - ASHANTI, ESKIMO, NUBIAN, TARTAR

 

HMS Tartar

 

 

Second Group, 7 ships completed by war's end - 1,930 tons, 36 knots, 6-4.7in/4tt, 250 crew, 1942-45, 1 lost:

ATHABASKAN (RCN) (Lt Cdr J H Stubbs RCN), 29th April 1944, Western Europe, off north coast of Brittany, France in English Channel, 10 miles north of Ile de Vierge (49.48N, 04.32W) – torpedoed by German torpedo boat ‘T.24’. Covering minelaying operation of Brittany with Canadian destroyer 'Haida'; 129 crew lost, 44 rescued by ‘Haida’, 84 taken prisoner with one rating dying of wounds. German ‘T.27’ driven ashore by 'Haida' in the action (English Channel Operations)

 

Surviving ships - ARUNTA, BATAAN, WARRAMUNGA (all RAN), HAIDA (preserved), HURON, IROQUOIS (all RCN)

 

HMAS Arunta

 

 

58. 'J' and 'K' classes, 16 ships - 1,690 tons, 36 knots, 6-4.7in/10tt, 185 crew, 1939, 12 lost: 

JACKAL (Cdr R Mc P Jonas), scuttled 12th May 1942, Eastern Mediterranean, north of Sidi Barrani, Egypt (32.23N, 26.25E) - by German Ju.88 bombers on 11th. Returning to Alexandria from planned hunt for Axis convoy to Benghazi; nine crew lost. 'Kipling' (below) and 'Lively' also lost. Only 'Jervis' escaped with 630 survivors from the three destroyers (North African Campaign)

 

JAGUAR (Lt Cdr L R K Tyrwhitt+), 26th March 1942, Eastern Mediterranean, off Sidi Barrani (31.53N, 26.18E) – torpedoed by German ‘U.652’ (Fraatz). Escorting tanker ‘Slavol’, sunk by ‘U.205’, to Tobruk; 194 crew lost; 53 survivors (North African Campaign)

 

JANUS (Lt Cdr W B Morrison+), 23rd January 1944, Central Mediterranean, off Anzio beachhead, western Italy (41.26N, 12.38E) – torpedoed by German He.111 torpedo bomber. On patrol off Anzio during Allied landings; 160 crew lost (Battle for Anzio - Italian Campaign)

 

JERSEY (Lt Cdr A F Burnell-Nugent), 2nd May 1941, Central Mediterranean, off Malta Grand Harbour - by mine, assumed Italian. Returning to Malta with cruiser 'Gloucester' after hunt for Axis convoy to Libya. Entering Grand Harbour; 35 crew lost (North African Campaign)

 

JUNO (Cdr St J R J Tyrwhitt), 21st May 1941, Eastern Mediterranean, off SE Crete (34.35N, 26.34E) - by German bombers. In action with Mediterranean Fleet against the German sea-borne invasion of Crete. Hit by three bombs, sank in two minutes; 128 crew lost, 97 survivors (Battle for Crete).

 

JUPITER (Lt Cdr N V J T Thew), 27th February 1942, East Indies, off north Java coast in Java Sea (c06.45S, 112.00E) - by mines, probably Dutch. With Australian/British/Dutch/American (ABDA) cruiser force in action; 96 crew lost, 47 taken prisoner of whom 27 died in captivity (Battle of the Java Sea - Japanese Invasion of Java).

 

KANDAHAR (Cdr W G A Robson), scuttled 20th December 1941, Central Mediterranean, off Tripoli, western Libya (c33.15N, 13.15E) - by Italian cruiser-laid mines on 19th. With cruiser Force 'K' in search for Italian convoy to Tripoli. Cruiser 'Neptune' also sunk. ‘Kandahar’ lost 72 crew, 165 were saved by ‘Jaguar’ (North African Campaign)

 

KELLY (leader) (Capt Lord Louis Mountbatten) and  KASHMIR (Cdr H A King), both 23rd May 1941, Eastern Mediterranean, off south Crete (c34.30N, 23.15E) - by German Ju.87 or Ju.88 divebombers. In action with Mediterranean Fleet against German sea-borne invasion of Crete; 'Kelly' lost 188 crew and ‘Kashmir’ 83 (Battle for Crete)

 

KHARTOUM (Cdr D T Dowler), 23rd June 1940, southern Red Sea, off island of Perim - by internal explosion from burst torpedo air vessel followed by fire. During gun action with other destroyers against Italian submarine 'Torricelli', also sunk. One rating was killed (Defence of Trade)

 

KINGSTON (Cdr P Somerville), 11th April 1942, Central Mediterranean, at Malta - by German or Italian bombers. In Grand Harbour, after being damaged during the Second Battle of Sirte, bombed and damaged again on 4th April with 14 crew killed. No crew lost on 11th (Malta Convoys)

 

KIPLING (Cdr A St Clair Ford), 11th May 1942, Eastern Mediterranean, north of Sidi Barrani, Egypt (32.28N, 26.20E) - by German Ju.88 bombers; 25 crew lost. See 'Jackal' above (North African Campaign)

 

Surviving ships - JERVIS (leader), JAVELIN, KELVIN, KIMBERLEY

 

HMS Javelin

 

 

59. 'L' and 'M' classes, 16 ships - 1,930 tons, 36 knots, 6-4.7in/8tt, 190 crew, 1940/42, 7 lost and 2 not repaired: 

LAFOREY (leader) (Capt H T Armstrong+), 30th March 1944, Central Mediterranean, 60 miles NE of Palermo, northern Sicily (38.54N, 14.18E) – torpedoed by German ‘U.223’ (Gerlach). Sunk in hunt for 'U.223' with three other destroyers; 182 crew lost, 69 saved by destroyers ‘Tumult’ and ‘Tuscan’. U-boat sunk by the other destroyers (Italian Campaign)

 

GURKHA (2) (ex-'Larne') (Cdr C N Lentaigne), 17th January 1942, Eastern Mediterranean, off Sidi Barrani, Egypt (31.50N, 26.15E) – torpedoed by German ‘U.133’ (Hesse). Close escort, Alexandria/Malta convoy MW.8; 10 crew lost (Malta Convoys)

 

LANCE (Lt Cdr R W Northcott), damaged 9th April 1942, Central Mediterranean, at Malta - by German or Italian bombers. In dry-dock at Grand Harbour undergoing repairs to earlier bomb damage; no crew killed at this time. Not repaired (Malta Convoys)

 

LEGION (Cdr R F Jessel), 26th March 1942, Central Mediterranean, in Grand Harbour, Malta - by German bombers. Back at Malta with cruiser Force 'K' after Second Battle of Sirte. Sunk with the loss of 11 men (Malta Convoys)

 

LIGHTNING (Cdr H G Walters), 12th March 1943, Central Mediterranean, north of Bizerta, Tunisia (37.53N, 9.50E) – torpedoed by German E-boat S.55. Sortie with Bone-based cruiser force 'Q' against Axis supply routes to Tunisia; 25 crew lost, 170 saved (French North African Campaign)

 

LIVELY (Lt Cdr W F Hussey+), 11th May 1942, Eastern Mediterranean, south of Crete (33.24N, 25.38E) - by German Ju.88 bombers. Returning to Alexandria from hunt for Axis convoy; 59 crew killed. Destroyers 'Jackal' and 'Kipling' also lost (North African Campaign)

 

LOYAL (Cdr G Ransome, Cdr D.14), damaged 12th October 1944, Central Mediterranean, in the Adriatic Sea - by mine, presumed German. Returning from bombarding shore targets on NE coast of Italy; no crew lost. Not repaired (Italian Campaign)

 

MAHRATTA (Lt Cdr E A F Drought+), 25th February 1944, Arctic Ocean, NW of Norway (71.17N, 13.30E) - by Gnat homing torpedo from German ‘U.990’ (Nordheimer) or ‘U.956’, both present (now listed as ‘U.990’). Escort to UK/Russian convoy JW.57; 220 crew lost, as few as two survivors (Russian Convoys)

 

MARTIN (Cdr C P R Thomson+), 10th November 1942, Western Mediterranean, NE of Algiers, Algeria (37.53N, 03.57E) – torpedoed by German ‘U.431’ (Dommes). With Force H covering Allied landings at Algiers and Oran during invasion of French North Africa; 159 crew lost, 63 saved (French North African Campaign)

 

Lost while manned by an Allied Navy - ORKAN, Polish Navy on 8th October 1943, North Atlantic

 

Surviving ships - LOOKOUT, MARNE, MATCHLESS, METEOR, MILNE (leader), MUSKETEER

 

HMS Meteor

 

 

60. 'N' class, 8 ships - 1,690 tons, 36 knots, 6-4.7in/10tt, 185 crew, 1940-42, 1 lost: 

NESTOR (RAN) (Cdr A S Rosenthal RAN), scuttled 16th June 1942, Eastern Mediterranean, south of Crete (33.36N, 24.27E) – hit by German Ju.87 divebombers on 15th. With cover force for Alexandria/Malta convoy 'Vigorous'; four crew lost (Malta Convoys).

 

Surviving ships - NAPIER (leader, RAN), NEPAL (RAN), NERISSA (Polish 'Piorun'), NIZAM (RAN), NOBLE (Dutch 'Van Galen'), NONPAREIL (Dutch 'Tjerk Hiddes'), NORMAN (RAN)

 

HMS Offa, 4in-armed "O" and "P" class destroyer, typical of wartime construction programmes

 

 

61. 'O' and 'P' classes, 16 ships - 1,540 tons, 36 knots, 4-4in or 4.7in/8tt, 175 crew, 1941-42, 3 lost and 2 not repaired: 

PAKENHAM (leader) (Cdr B Jones), 16th April 1943, Central Mediterranean, north of Pantelleria island in the Strait of Sicily (37.26N, 12.30E) - by 3.9in gunfire of Italian torpedo boats 'Cassiopea' and 'Cigno'. Attacking Italian convoy to Tunisia with destroyer 'Paladin'; 10 crew lost. 'Cigno' sunk (French North African Campaign)

 

PANTHER (Lt Cdr Viscount Jocelyn), 9th October 1943, Eastern Mediterranean, SW of Rhodes island in Scarpanto Strait (35.48N, 27.38E) - by German Ju.87 divebombers. Returning from sweep against German supply traffic west of Kos island; 36 crew lost (British Aegean Campaign)

 

PARTRIDGE (Lt Cdr W A F Hawkins), 18th December 1942, Western Mediterranean, west of Oran, Algeria (35.50N, 01.35W) – torpedoed by German ‘U.565’ (Franken). With Force H on anti-submarine sweep; 38 crew lost, 173 crew saved (French North African campaign)

 

PATHFINDER (Lt Cdr T F Hallifax), damaged 11th February 1945, South East Asia, off Ramree Island, NW Burma - by Japanese bombers. Supporting British and Dominion landings on Ramree Island, Burmese Arakan campaign; no crew lost. To reserve (Burma Campaign)

 

PORCUPINE (Cdr G S Stewart RAN), damaged 9th December 1942, Western Mediterranean, NE of Oran, Algeria (36.40N, 00.04W) – torpedoed by German ‘U.602’ (Schüler). Escorting depot ship 'Maidstone' from Gibraltar to Algiers; seven crew lost. Reached Gibraltar, but not repaired (French North African Campaign)

 

Surviving ships - ONSLOW (leader), OBDURATE, OBEDIENT, OFFA, ONSLAUGHT, OPPORTUNE, ORIBI, ORWELL, PALADIN, PENN, PETARD

 

HMS Onslaught - main guns trained to starboard

 

 

62. 'Q' and 'R' classes, 16 ships - 1,700 tons, 37 knots, 4-4.7in/8tt, 175 crew, 1942-43, 2 lost: 

QUAIL, foundered 18th June 1944, Central Mediterranean, in Gulf of Taranto, southern Italy (40.05N, 17.52E) - previously damaged by mine off Bari in southern Adriatic Sea on 15th November 1943; Lt Cdr R F Jenks in command and 21 crew lost at the time. Now on tow from Bari to Taranto with steaming party; one rating missing (Italian Campaign)

 

QUENTIN (Lt Cdr A H P Noble), 2nd December 1942, Central Mediterranean, off Galita Islands, off north Tunisia (37.40N, 08.55E) – torpedoed by Italian torpedo aircraft. Returning with cruiser Force 'Q' to Bone, Algeria after attack on Italian convoy to Tunisia; 10 crew lost (French North African Campaign)

 

Surviving ships - QUILLIAM (leader), QUADRANT (RAN from 1945), QUALITY (RAN from 1945), QUEENBOROUGH (RAN from 1945), QUIBERON (RAN), QUICKMATCH (RAN), ROTHERHAM (leader), RACEHORSE, RAIDER, RAPID, REDOUBT, RELENTLESS, ROCKET, ROEBUCK

 

 

 

63. 'S', 'T', 'U', 'V' and 'W' classes, 40 ships - 1,700 tons, 37 knots, 4-4.7in/8tt, 180 crew, 1943/44, 2 lost:  

HARDY (2) ('V' leader) (Capt W G Robson), 30th January 1944, Arctic Ocean, 60 miles south of Bear island in Barents Sea (73.37N, 18.06E) - by Gnat homing torpedoes from German ‘U.278’ (Franze). Escort to UK/Russian convoy JW.56B. Scuttled with second torpedo; 35 crew lost (Russian Convoys)

 

SWIFT (Lt Cdr J R Gower), 24th June 1944, Western Europe, off Sword Beach, Normandy, France, 5 miles north of Ouistreham - by German mine. Support duties off beachhead; 17 crew lost (Normandy Invasion)

 

Lost while manned by an Allied Navy - SVENNER, Norwegian Navy, 6th June 1944, off Normandy

 

Surviving ships - SAUMAREZ (leader), SAVAGE, SCORPION, SCOURGE, SERAPIS, SUCCESS (Norwegian 'Stord' from 1943), TROUBRIDGE (leader), TEAZER, TENACIOUS, TERMAGANT, TERPISCHORE, TUMULT, TUSCAN, TYRIAN, GRENVILLE (2) ('U' leader), ULSTER, ULYSSES, UNDAUNTED, UNDINE, URANIA, URCHIN, URSA, VALENTINE (RCN ALGONQUIN), VENUS, VERULAM, VIGILANT, VIRAGO, VIXEN (RCN SIOUX), VOLAGE, KEMPENFELT ('W' leader), WAGER, WAKEFUL (2), WESSEX (2), WHELP, WHIRLWIND (2), WIZARD, WRANGLER

 

HMCS Sioux (ex-Vixen)

 

 

64. 'Z' and 'Ca' classes, 16 ships - 1,700 tons, 37 knots, 4-4.5in/8tt, 185 crew, 1944-45 

Surviving ships - MYNGS (leader), ZAMBESI, ZEALOUS, ZEBRA, ZENITH, ZEPHYR, ZEST, ZODIAC, CAVENDISH (leader), CAESAR, CAMBRIAN, CAPRICE, CARRON, CARYSFORT, CASSANDRA, CAVALIER (preserved)

HMS Cavendish

 

 

65. Battle class, 5 ships completed by war's end - 2,310 tons, 36 knots, 4-4.5in/8tt, 250 crew, 1944/45 

Surviving ships - ARMADA, (leader), BARFLEUR (leader), CAMPERDOWN, HOGUE, TRAFALGAR (leader)

 

HMS Barfleur

 

 

 

ESCORT DESTROYERS

 

 

66. Hunt classes

 

Type 1, 23 ships - 1,000 tons, 28 knots, 4-4in, 145 crew, 1940-41, 4 lost:  

BERKELEY (Lt J J S Yorke), 19th August 1942, Western Europe, off Dieppe, northern France in English Channel (49.57N, 01.04E) - by German fighter-bombers. Covering British/Canadian combined operations raid on Dieppe, operation 'Jubilee'; 15 crew lost (Dieppe Raid)

 

EXMOOR (Lt Cdr R T Lampard+), 25th February 1941, Western Europe, off Lowestoft, eastern England in North Sea (c52.30N, 01.45E) – torpedoed by German E-boat ‘S.30’. Escorting Thames/Forth coastal convoy FN.417; 105 crew lost, 32 survivors (British Coastal Convoys)

 

QUORN (Lt I Hall), 3rd August 1944, Western Europe, off Normandy beaches, northern France in English Channel - by German 'Linsen' explosive motor boat or 'Marder' human torpedo. On patrol off British beachhead; 130 crew lost (Normandy Invasion)

 

TYNEDALE (Lt Cdr J J S Yorke), 12th December 1943, Western Mediterranean, NE of Bougie, Algeria (37.10N, 06.05E) – torpedoed by German ‘U.593’ (Kelbling). Escorting UK/North African convoy KMS.34; 73 crew lost. 'Holcombe' (below) also sunk (Mediterranean Convoys)

 

Surviving ships - ATHERSTONE, BLENCATHRA, BROCKLESBY, CATTISTOCK, CLEVELAND, COTSWOLD, COTTESMORE, EGLINTON, FERNIE, GARTH, HAMBLEDON, HOLDERNESS, LIDDESDALE, MENDIP, MMEYNELL, PYTCHLEY, QUANTOCK, SOUTHDOWN, WHADDON

 

HMS Brocklesby

 

Type 2, 33 ships, - 1,050 tons, 27 knots, 6-4in, 170 crew, 1941-42, 6 lost and 1 not repaired: 

DULVERTON (Cdr S A Buss+), 13th November 1943, Eastern Mediterranean, 5 miles off Kos island in the Aegean Sea (36.50N, 27.30E) - by German Hs.293 glider bomb launched from Do.217 aircraft. With two other destroyers in search for German transports heading for Leros; 78 crew lost, 109 saved by destroyer ‘Echo’ and escort destroyer ‘Belvoir’ (British Aegean Campaign)

 

ERIDGE (Lt Cdr W F N Gregory-Smith), damaged 29th August 1942, Eastern Mediterranean, near El Alamein, Egypt (31.07N, 28.26E) – presumed torpedoed by German E-boat. Returning from bombardment of Daba, west of El Alamein; five crew lost. Not repaired (North African Campaign)

 

GROVE (Cdr W J Rylands), 12th June 1942, Eastern Mediterranean, off Sidi Barrani, Egypt (32.05N, 25.30E) – torpedoed by German ‘U.77’ (Schonder). Returning to Alexandria after escorting supply ships to Tobruk; 112 crew lost, 80 saved (North African Campaign)

 

HEYTHROP (Lt Cdr R S Stafford), 20th March 1942, Eastern Mediterranean, off Sidi Barrani, Egypt (32.22N, 25.28E) – torpedoed by German ‘U.652’ (Fraatz). Carrying out anti-submarine sweep ahead of Alexandria/Malta convoy (believed MW.10), prior to Second Battle of Sirte, finished off by sister ship ‘Eridge’; 16 crew lost (Malta Convoys)

 

HURWORTH (Cdr R H Wright), 22nd October 1943, Eastern Mediterranean, north of Kos Island in the Aegean Sea (36.59N, 27.06E) - by mine laid by German minelayer 'Drache'. Carrying supplies to Leros and assisting mined Greek sister ship 'Adrias'; 133 crew lost (British Aegean Campaign)

 

PUCKERIDGE (Lt J C Cartwright), 6th September 1943, Western Mediterranean, 40 miles east of Gibraltar (36.06N, 04.44W) -  torpedoed by German ‘U.617’ (Brandi). On passage from Gibraltar to Oran; 62 crew lost (Mediterranean Operations)

 

SOUTHWOLD (Cdr C T Jellicoe), 24th March 1942, Central Mediterranean, off Malta - by Italian mine. Close escort, Alexandria/Malta convoy (believed MW.10), after Second Battle of Sirte; 5 crew lost (Malta Convoys)

 

Lost while manned by an Allied Navy - KUJAWIAK (ex-OAKLEY (1)), Polish Navy, 16th June 1942, off Malta

 

Surviving ships - AVON VALE, BADSWORTH, BEAUFORT, BEDALE (Polish 'Slazak' from 1942), BICESTER, BLACKMORE, BLANKNEY, BRAMHAM (Greek 'Themistocles' from 1943), CALPE, CHIDDINGFOLD, COWDRAY, CROOME, EXMOOR (2), FARNDALE, HURSLEY (Greek 'Kriti' from 1943), LAMERTON, LAUDERDALE, LEDBURY, MIDDLETON, OAKLEY (2), SILVERTON (Polish 'Krakowiak' from 1941), TETCOTT, WHEATLAND, WILTON, ZETLAND

 

Polish Navy ORP Kujawiak (ex-HMS Oakley)

 

Type 3, 28 ships - 1,050 tons, 27 knots, 4-4in/2tt, 170 crew, 1942/43, 6 lost and 4 not repaired: 

AIREDALE (Lt Cdr A G Forman), 15th June 1942, Eastern Mediterranean, south of Crete (33.50N, 23.50E) - by German Ju.87 divebombers. Close escort, Alexandria/Malta convoy 'Vigorous'; 48 crew lost (Malta Convoys)

 

ALDENHAM (Cdr J S Farrant), 14th December 1944, Central Mediterranean, 30 miles NW of Zara in northern Adriatic Sea (44.30N, 14.50E) - by German mines. Believed returning from bombarding German held islands in approaches to Fiume; 121 crew lost, 63 saved (Italian Campaign)

 

BLEAN (Lt M J Parker), 11th December 1942, Western Mediterranean, 60 miles west of Oran, Algeria (35.55N, 01.50W) – torpedoed by German ‘U.443’ (Puttkamer). Escorting North Africa/UK convoy MKF.4; 89 crew lost, 94 saved (French North African Campaign)

 

DERWENT (Lt P R C Higham), damaged 19th March 1943, Central Mediterranean, Tripoli harbour, western Libya - torpedoed by German Ju.88 torpedo bomber. At anchor in harbour; four crew lost. To limited duties (North African campaign)

 

GOATHLAND (Lt Cdr E N Pumphrey), damaged 24th July 1944, Western Europe, 15 miles north of Normandy beaches, France in English Channel - by German mine. On patrol off beachhead; no lives lost. Not repaired (Normandy Invasion)

 

HOLCOMBE (Lt F M Graves), 12th December 1943, Western Mediterranean, NE of Bougie, Algeria (37.20N, 05.30E) – torpedoed by German ‘U.593’ (Kelbling). Escorting UK/North African convoy KMS.34, and hunting for ‘U.593’ after sinking of sister-ship 'Tynedale' (above); 84 crew lost. ‘U.593’ sunk next day (Mediterranean Convoys)

 

LIMBOURNE (Cdr W J Phipps), 23rd October 1943, Western Europe, off north coast of Brittany, northern France in English Channel (48.59N, 03.39W) – torpedoed by German torpedo boat ‘T.22’. Sortie with cruiser 'Charybdis' (also lost) and other destroyers to intercept German blockade runner; 42 men lost, 103 saved (English Channel Operations)

 

PENYLAN (Lt Cdr J H Wallace), 3rd December 1942, Western Europe, 5 miles south of Start Point, SW England in English Channel (50.08N, 03.39W) – torpedoed by German E-boat ‘S.115’. Escorting Portsmouth/Bristol Channel coastal convoy PW.257; 36 crew lost, 117 saved (British Coastal Convoys)

 

ROCKWOOD (Lt S R Le H L Hobson), damaged 11th November 1943, Eastern Mediterranean, off Kos island in Aegean Sea (36.50N, 27.30E) - by German Hs.293 glider bomb from Do.217 aircraft. Bombed after shore bombardment in Kalymnos island area; one crew lost. To reserve (British Aegean Campaign)

 

WENSLEYDALE (Lt Cdr W P Goodfellow RNVR), damaged 21st November 1944, Western Europe, Thames Estuary, SE England - in collision with LST.367. On patrol off the Nore; no lives lost. To reserve (Defence of British Waters)

 

Lost while manned by Allied navies - ADRIAS, Greek Navy, damaged 22nd October 1943 and not repaired; ESKDALE, Norwegian Navy, 14th April 1943, off SW England; LA COMBATTANTE, French Navy, 23rd February 1945, North Sea

 

Surviving ships - ALBRIGHTON, BELVOIR, BLEASDALE, BOLEBROKE (Greek 'Pindos' from 1942), CATTERICK, EASTON, EGGESFORD, GLAISDALE, HATHERLEIGH (Greek 'Kanaris' from 1942), HAYDON, MELBREAK, MODBURY (Greek 'Miaoulis' from 1942), STEVENSTONE, TALYBONT, TANATSIDE

 

 

HMS Limbourne

 

Type 4, 2 ships - 1,175 tons, 26 knots, 6-4in/3tt, 170 crew, 1942-43 

Surviving ships - BRECON, BRISSENDEN

 


HMS Brecon

 

ex-U.S. DESTROYERS

 

 

67. Town classes, 50 ships transferred in 1940 - 1,050 tons, 35 knots, 1 to 3-4in/3tt, 145 crew, c 1918, 7 lost and 1 not repaired:  

BELMONT (Lt Cdr G B O’B Harding+), 31st January 1942, North Atlantic, SE of Halifax, Nova Scotia (42.02N, 57.18W) – torpedoed by German ‘U.82’ (Rollmann). Escorting Canadian troop convoy NA.2 to UK; 138 men lost (Battle of the Atlantic)

 

BEVERLEY (Lt Cdr R A Price+), 11th April 1943, North Atlantic, south of Greenland (52.19N, 40.28W) – torpedoed by German ‘U.188’ (Lüdden). With British B6 group escorting UK/North American convoy ON.176; 148 crew lost, only four rescued (Battle of the Atlantic)

 

BROADWATER (Lt Cdr W M L Astwood), 18th October 1941, North Atlantic, west of Ireland (57.01N, 19.08W) – torpedoed by German ‘U.101’ (Mengersen). With US Escort Group escorting Halifax/UK convoy SC.48; 44 crew plus rescued merchant seamen lost (Battle of the Atlantic)

 

CAMERON, damaged 5th December 1940, Western Europe, at Portsmouth, southern England - by German bombers. In dry-dock for refit; 14 crew killed. Reduced to experimental ship for hull stress testing.

 

CAMPBELTOWN (Lt Cdr S H Beattie, awarded VC), 28th March 1942, Western Europe, at St Nazaire, French Biscay coast - expended as explosive blockship. British combined operations raid on St Nazaire to destroy the Normandie lock gates and prevent their use by battleship 'Tirpitz'; 32 crew lost, 16 taken prisoner (St Nazaire Raid)

 

ROCKINGHAM (Lt Cdr J C Cooper RNVR), 27th September 1944, Western Europe, 30 miles SE of Aberdeen, Scotland in North Sea (56.29N, 00.57W) – believed British mine. Target ship for aircraft training, mined in 56.47N, 01.30W, taken in tow and sank; one rating killed.

 

ST CROIX (RCN) (Lt Cdr A H Dobson RCN+), 20th September 1943, North Atlantic, SE of Greenland (57.30N, 31.10W) – torpedoed by German ‘U.305’ (Bahr). With Canadian 9th Escort Group supporting UK/North American convoys ONS.18 and ON.202. Hit once by ‘U.305’, finished off an hour later by the same U-boat; 147 crew lost (Battle of the Atlantic)

 

STANLEY (Lt Cdr D B Shaw+), 19th December 1941, North Atlantic, west of Portugal (38.12N, 17.23W) – torpedoed by German ‘U.574’ (Gengelbach). Escort, Gibraltar/UK convoy HG.76; 134 lost including four officers on passage. Escort carrier 'Audacity' also sunk (Battle of the Atlantic)

 

Lost while manned by Allied Navies - BATH, Norwegian Navy, 19th August 1941, North Atlantic; DEYATELNYI  (ex-CHURCHILL), Russian Navy, 16th January 1945, Arctic

 

Surviving ships - ANNAPOLIS (RCN), BRADFORD, BRIGHTON, (Russian from 1944), BROADWAY, BURNHAM, BURWELL, BUXTON (RCN 1943-44), CALDWELL (RCN 1942-44), CASTLETON, CHARLESTOWN, CHELSEA (RCN 1942-43, Russian from 1944), CHESTERFIELD, CLARE, COLUMBIA (RCN), GEORGETOWN (RCN 1942-43, Russian from 1944), HAMILTON (RCN), LANCASTER, LEAMINGTON  (RCN 1942-43, Russian from 1944), LEEDS, LEWES, LINCOLN (Norwegian 1942-43, Russian from 1944), LUDLOW, MANSFIELD (Norwegian 1940-42, RCN 1942-43), MONTGOMERY (RCN 1942-43), NEWARK, NEWMARKET, NEWPORT (Norwegian 1941-42), NIAGARA (RCN), RAMSEY, READING, RICHMOND (RCN 1942-43, Russian from 1944), RIPLEY, ROXBURGH (Russian from 1944), ST ALBANS (Norwegian 1941-44, Russian from 1944), ST CLAIR (RCN), ST FRANCIS (RCN), ST MARY'S, SALISBURY (RCN 1942-43), SHERWOOD, WELLS

 

HMS Clare

 

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